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How to survive hot days!

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CrispR
(@crispr)
Eminent Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 11
Topic starter  

Weather has been changing and there are more and more hot days in BC. They cause lots of problems like drought, wild fires and health problems.

My parents are older people in their 80s. I am really concern about their condition on hot days like we have recently. Do you have any advises for older people that could help them to survive hot days? Please share with me if you do.

I general I ask them to avoid insolation especially between noon and 4 pm. I ask them to drink plenty of water and wear bright (sun reflecting) and sheer clothing. I bought the portable a/c unit which helps a bit to cool down the air temperature in their apartment. Do you think, there is something else to make their lives easier on such day?

Please share your opinions and ideas. Thank you, Monika.


   
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MarkM
(@markm)
Active Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 9
 

Hi there,

You should remember that there is high risk group of people for whom how weather is very dangerous.We can include here:

• Those who work in the heat
• Infants and young children,
• People 65 and older
• People who are ill, have chronic health conditions or are on certain medications
• People who are overweight.

Please remember that you cannot leave infants, children and pets in hot cars. This is recipe for rapid heat stroke that can be fatal.

We should be aware that heat exhaustion and heat stroke can develop during hot days. This is why it is very important to recognize and know their symptoms. It can really save a life.

Heat exhaustion Symptoms:

• Pale, ashen or moist skin
• Muscle cramps
• Fatigue, weakness or exhaustion
• Headache, dizziness or fainting
• Nausea or vomiting
• Rapid heart rate

What to do?

• Move victims to a shaded or air-conditioned area
• Give water or other cool but nonalcoholic beverages
• Apply wet towels, or have victims take a cool shower

 

Heat stroke symptoms:

• Body temperature above 39 degrees of Celsius
• Skin that is flushed, dry and hot to the touch; sweating has usually stopped
• Rapid breathing
• Headache, dizziness, confusion or other signs of altered mental status
• Irrational or belligerent behavior
• Convulsions or unresponsiveness

What to do?

• Call for ambulance
• Move the victim to a cool place
• Remove unnecessary clothing
• Immediately cool the victim, preferably by immersing up to the neck in cold water
• If immersion in cold water is not possible, place the victim in a cold shower or  cover as much of the body as possible with cold, wet towels
• Keep cooling until body temperature drops to 101 degrees
• Monitor the victim's breathing and be ready to give CPR if needed

and how to keep out of troubles?

• Air conditioning is the best way to cool off
• Drink fluids, even if you don’t feel thirsty, and avoid alcohol
• Wear loose, lightweight clothing and a hat
• Replace salt lost from sweating by drinking fruit juice or sports drinks
• Avoid spending time outdoors during the hottest part of the day, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
• Wear sunscreen; sunburn affects the body's ability to cool itself

 

HOPE THIS HELPS.


   
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